How will I know if my cat is in pain, and what are some of the signs and symptoms of pain?

Cats in pain often don't really come out and tell you that they have pain. They usually become more reserved, meaning they're going to hide more from you. They may lash out at you if you touch a painful area when you're petting them. Cats in pain may be more reluctant to move around the house, stop jumping higher, or may not want to eat or drink as much because they're uncomfortable. They act a bit more reclusive and uncomfortable when you pet them and interact with them.

Dr. Noel Lucas
Blue Oasis Pet Hospital

Why is it important to avoid self-diagnosing pain?

Self-diagnosing of pain is discouraged because you may know that your cat is a little off or not feeling their best, but it's important to get a professional's opinion. Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian for them to assess your cat and perform a physical exam. They might be able to figure out where the painful process is happening.

What are some possible conditions that can cause cat pain, and what are some of the pain treatments?

Some common causes of cat pain include trauma such as being bitten by another cat, getting an abscess, being hit by a car, or having an orthopedic injury. Older cats can experience arthritis. Cancers and oral diseases are also painful processes for cats. The treatments will depend on the specific condition and the source of the pain.

What types of pain medications might a veterinarian prescribe for a cat?

We have to be careful with cats because they have their own unique sensitivities to medications. However, there are quite a few prescription pain medications that can be used for cats. The specific medication we use comes down to what we think is the source of their pain, which we can only determine through a physical examination and possibly some diagnostic tests. If you feel your cat may be in any kind of pain, please get them to a veterinarian.

If you still have other questions and you'd like to reach out to us, you can call us directly at (615) 975-2583 , or you can email us at [email protected]. But please do reach out, and we'll get back to you as fast as we can. Don't forget to follow us on social media Facebook, Instagram

Cat Pain Medications - FAQ 1

Dr. Noel Lucas
Blue Oasis Pet Hospital

What are some signs that a cat may be in pain?

Some signs your cat may be in pain could include: they may go and hide (which I call suffering silently), they may be reluctant to eat or drink, they might show some lameness or mobility issues, they may not groom themselves as much resulting in an unkempt or matted hair coat. Pain signs can be subtle and cats don't usually vocalize when they're in pain, although they could if the pain is severe, especially if you touch a painful area. They might show aggression or even vocalize with some pain.

<

What kind of things can cause pain in a cat?

Some types of pain in cats could be caused by an injury, such as a cat bite abscess which are incredibly painful. The cat might show an area of a wound or hair loss and swelling in the area of the injury. Lameness or limping is also a sign of pain. If your cat used to jump a lot but is now staying down on the floor more and not going up in vertical spaces, that can be a sign of arthritic pain. Unfortunately, cancer growing in the body can also cause pain, making the cat seem more reclusive or tired.

What should one do if they suspect their cat is in pain?

If you suspect your cat may be in pain, we absolutely want you to reach out to your veterinarian. They can partner with you, do a good physical exam, find the sources of pain, conduct some diagnostic tests, and then really partner with you to get the right treatment for your cat so that they can live a pain-free life.

Where can one reach out if they have specific questions about cats and pain?

If you have specific questions about cats and pain, we recommend that you reach out to Blue Oasis Pet Hospital. We'd love to answer any questions you have.

If you still have other questions and you'd like to reach out to us, you can call us directly at (615) 975-2583 , or you can email us at [email protected]. But please do reach out, and we'll get back to you as fast as we can. Don't forget to follow us on social media Facebook, Instagram

Cat Pain Medications - FAQ 2

Dr. Noel Lucas
Blue Oasis Pet Hospital

What signs might indicate a cat is in pain?

Cats often suffer silently, hiding when they are in pain. Indicators of pain can include reluctance to eat or drink, lameness or mobility issues, and less frequent grooming, leading to an unkempt or matted hair coat. Cats usually don't vocalize their pain, but they might if the pain is severe, such as when a painful area is touched. They can also become more aggressive, attempt to bite, or vocalize their pain.

What can cause pain in cats?

Injuries can cause pain in cats. For instance, a cat bite abscess from a fight is particularly painful and often results in a visible wound, hair loss, or swelling in the area of injury. Lameness or limping is another sign of pain. Cats live in a "3D world", jumping and scaling vertical spaces; if your cat starts staying closer to the floor, it could be a sign of arthritic pain. Even internal issues like cancer can cause cats to become more reclusive, tired, and silently suffering with pain.

What should I do if I suspect my cat is in pain?

If you suspect your cat is in pain or behaving strangely, it's imperative to consult with your veterinarian. They can perform a thorough physical exam, identify potential sources of pain, conduct diagnostic tests, and recommend appropriate treatment to ensure your cat's comfort and well-being.

If you still have other questions and you'd like to reach out to us, you can call us directly at (615) 975-2583 , or you can email us at [email protected]. But please do reach out, and we'll get back to you as fast as we can. Don't forget to follow us on social media Facebook, Instagram